Good intentions

It had started well enough, I had decided today was the day that I was going to purge some old photos to make room for more recent stuff, something I have been meaning to do for longer than I care to think.
With four external hard drives of photos to wade through, I was in for the long haul.

That was the intention anyway, as I began to look at the first few folders, the memories of days out with friends and family were there in front of me, the digital equivalent of my parents old box of photos that came out just a few times a year, normally coinciding with the visit of great Aunt Mabel.

My earlier determination long since evaporated, instead of deleting unwanted images, here I sat uploading a few previously unedited images, adding more to my hard drive instead of the planned purge.

Laughing in the face of my own inefficiency, I was quite enjoying a trip through my photographic journey of the last few years.
My backup photos remain in the unsorted manner in which I began four hours ago but when I get my new hard drive later next week, it will be properly catalogued….. maybe.

A few images from the archives:

 

First sunrise of the year

Already nearly two weeks into the new year but today is my first opportunity to capture the first sunrise of 2020 and being January, I can set an alarm for a more sociable hour than those 3am alarm calls of the early summer.
The alarm is not not required, the sound of wind whistling around the windows and the last of the heavy rain are playing their final encores, or so I hope.

I am well ahead of time this morning, so I relish the last of two hot buttered crumpets and a second cup of strong tea, finish packing my camera bag and prepare a flask of tea to take with me.

It will take me just under an hour to reach a place for my first glimpse of the sunrise, as I head out into what still appears to be midnight!
Slowly but surely, the last of the heavy clouds begin to disperse and the sky begins to brighten, as I approach the footpath by the River Exe, the remaining clouds show the fiery tinged edges of the morning sun.


As I make my way along the path, there is an abundance of photo opportunities, light and shadow,colours and contrast feed my creative appetite with ideas.

With a chance of showers forecast, I watch the build up of cloud cautiously but the weather gods appear to be in a better mood of late and what little rain there is passes behind me.

The trees, bereft of foliage give some lovely shadows against the painted sky, I also see opportunities for some black and white images here.

The next part of my walk takes me back towards the quayside at Exeter, as I progress, it is clear that others intend to make the most of this sunny Sunday, sleek sculling boats from the local rowing clubs pass by with effortless grace, while in places, fishermen are casting their first baits of the day in their search for piscatorial pleasure.

With a good six miles under my belt, I reach the quayside at Exeter, where I meet a couple of friends for a new year catch up, the review of today’s images will be something to look forward to later this afternoon.

New life in old lenses

It was about eighteen months after purchasing my first mirrorless camera roughly six years ago, I read an article about the possibility of using lenses from SLR cameras with an adaptor, I was intrigued to say the least, another chapter in my photography journey was to begin.

Typically of anyone into photography, my collection of old glass grew quite quickly, a range of 50mm lenses from 1.4 to 2.8 some other wider primes and a couple of zoom lenses, all bought at reasonable prices online, or the odd charity shop.

Many of my original purchases have since been sold again or passed on to friends, the few that remain are favourites that are about to experience a new lease of life in 2020


Today’s choice was a Prakticar 80-200mm F4.0 – 5.6 lens, not the fastest lens ever but the early part of the day was offering bright sunshine, ideal for capturing any squirrels or bird life that I might see on today’s quick outing.

After a patient wait, I see my first subject matter, my lack of practice with a zoom lens shows in my first few shots, blurry and not in focus, also trying to remember lenses as old as this one are inherently softer at the upper reach of the zoom.

After adding a few more nuts to the already healthy squirrel picnic, one seems happy enough with my presence to carry on eating his fill.


From here, the River Exe is just a five minute walk, the ever present gulls line the railings by the river bank, I get as close as I dare to try a few more shots.


Just a few minutes after the gull shots, the heavens decide to open and I take shelter under one of the bridges spanning the river, it would appear that I could be here for a while, the rain is getting heavier but I am dry here, so I look for more photo opportunities, what can I get with my zoom?

From my shelter, I spot the water teeming from the bridge, might look good in black and white?
A single leaf from a bush at the far extreme of my shelter…snap

I watch the pigeons and gulls at the edge of the pathway, unfazed by the teeming rain they continue their day.

I am not expecting today’s images to have the sharpness of my Fuji glass, yet they have a character of their own that I really like, especially in the monochrome images.
It is so easy to become distracted with the need for sharpness, sometimes it is the imperfections that make us look in a different way.

Perfect or not, I have had another enjoyable few hours out, doing what I enjoy most.

Mission accomplished

Twelve months ago today, I had embarked upon my one camera, one lens,one year challenge, I can honestly say that initially I had doubts that I would actually complete it, yet here I am, about to share the final blog of 2019 and for me, one of my best days out of the year.

The last few days had followed a pattern of sporadic rain, and dull, uninspiring skies but today was to be the best of the weather before the new year, so a trip to Dartmoor was the order of the day.

Driving through the southern part of the moor, the skies were bright and cloudless, but as Princetown loomed ever closer, it was hidden under  low cloud and fog, the perfect ingredients for a moody Dartmoor and a visit to the ruins and quarry of Foggintor.

With no wind, an eerie silence was broken only by the sound of walking boot on gravel, an occasional attempt by the late December sun to break through the misty shroud was thwarted, yet ethereally beautiful.

As with all the best days on Dartmoor, the changing light and weather can happen in a second, today was no exception, at one moment, the sun threatens once more to pierce the mist, then once again the mist rolls in a little more, this meteorological tug of war will continue throughout today’s outing, giving some truly breathtaking scenery along the way.

My camera settings fluctuate between moody monochromatic and colour, trying to capture all moods, I have decided to shoot just Jpegs today, I have learned enough this year to know that the ‘F’ will capture the scene the way I want, why spend hours at a computer editing?

At the end of just over six miles, just a few yards away from the car park and I am still taking shots, I know that this has been one of my best outings of the year, I hope my images have done Dartmoor justice.

In terms of a project for 2020, the canvas remains blank, I have some vintage lenses I will look forward to using once more with my Xe2, I have also acquired a Fuji 16mm (24 equiv) F2 lens which is as yet unused.

This blog, which has been a most enjoyable part of the last 12 months will continue to tell the story of my days out, I am very appreciative of the many kind words of encouragement I have received from those that have taken time out of their day to read my musings in 2019.

T’was the Sunday before Christmas

It’s the last weekend before Christmas, as usual, I have no wish to be a part of the crowds seeking those last minute Christmas gifts, instead a trip just a few miles from Exeter, to Shaldon is my plan for the day.

Shaldon sits on the opposite side of the estuary from Teignmouth, it is one of those charming little towns that I like to visit throughout the seasons.
Shaldon boasts its own zoo and famous ‘smugglers tunnels’ built by the 8th Lord Clifford in the 1860’s, to give access to the ‘ness’ beach.
Evidence of the Clifford family influence is still prominent within the town, the Clifford arms and Clifford close are reminders of the town’s history.

It is amazing to think of the number of times I had visited Shaldon without any photos of the tunnels, this is something I shall put right today.


In taking pictures of the tunnels, it occurred that in all my visits here, I had never truly explored thoroughly, so why not do so today, attempting some different images from my usual seascape views that I always enjoy.

As I walk along the sea front, a fishing competition is taking place, a local angling club fishing for flounders, their annual Christmas hamper competition.
Some of the anglers have had early catches, others not so lucky but say a bad days fishing is far better than spending the day shopping!

After a stroll along the beach, a quick visit to St. Peter the apostle church, where the festive display is looking resplendent, I like the challenge of low light photography, so take a few images here.

It seems my detour into the church was timely, a heavy squall just passes, as I head further on today’s foray.

Having walked further along the road than I had normally done, this is where I stumble across the church of St Nicolas, one of those moments of fortunate happenstance.
The doors were not open for exploration within the church but the graveyard has a number of commonwealth graves.

As I look compose my next few shots, the sun appears from behind the cloud to give the church a lovely light, why had I not walked here before?

As I am enjoying a post walk snack and cup of tea, the wind is blowing stronger, I watch the increasingly larger waves crash into the sea wall at Teignmouth, I never fail to be fascinated by the raw power of the sea.

 

Avoiding the Christmas crowds

With just one more weekend before the Christmas holidays, today’s trip was planned to be away from the madding Christmas crowds, seeking their inspiration for festive gifts.

After a traditional English breakfast at a favourite cafe, the destination was to be Brixham, one of my favourite towns to photograph, with it’s fishing heritage and thriving community, it always offers a warm welcome.

A keen wind reminds us that winter is waiting just around the corner, it is however warmer when the sun makes its welcome sporadic appearances from behind the passing clouds, blown like tumbleweed across the mid day skies.

The wooden kiosks that in the height of summer offer boat trips around the bay or seafood brought fresh from Brixham’s famous fish market are boarded shut for the winter months, in hibernation until the early spring.

Cafes along the harbour area are undergoing winter refurbishments, or closed while their proprietors take well earned winter breaks, after a hopefully busy summer season.
Those that are open are welcome refuges for those few that enjoy the quieter out of season months.

The light has a lovely quality today, my walk along the breakwater gives some very moody photo opportunities, a perfect day for photography, maybe not so perfect for the few fishermen that have braved the elements today, as they cast their lines from the breakwater wall into the sea below.

One of my favourite shots of the day is taken from here, a lone trawler sets sail as foreboding clouds make their way out to sea, the remnants of a rainbow just visible in the sky.


One of the things I enjoy most about revisiting a place throughout the year, is the opportunity to capture the location in all its moods, fair and foul, warm and cold.

I am hoping at some time in the next few months to photograph Brixham at night, just another of the many items I need to cross off my photographic bucket list.

49 weeks

As I wrote the title above, I can scarcely believe that in just three weeks time it will be new year’s eve, the final day of my one camera challenge.
No doubt, I will be out somewhere on that day, weather allowing, as I will be one of the many fortunate enough to be  enjoying some time off over the Christmas holidays.

Will there be a new project in 2020? perhaps not a long term one, maybe a series of monthly ideas, as I am looking forward to using the camera bodies I have left at home over the last 12 months.

I had an idea earlier this year, that I would enhance my camera collection as a ‘reward’ for completing my project but I have a collection of vintage lenses I have bought online over the last 2 or 3 years, that will be fun to use again, they can be used on the systems I already have, no need to change!

My trusty 100f will always have a place in my camera bag, I have enjoyed seeing the world through 35mm but no doubt I will also be using 50mm, another favourite focal length of mine.

The ‘F’ was taken out again yesterday, a few hours out at a nature park just 20 minutes from home, then to the seaside on the way back, this little beauty never fails to give a lot of fun in taking photos.

I would be interested to know of any photo projects that others are embarking on next year, I hope you get as much enjoyment from yours as I have mine this year